Pre-Meeting Workshop

Monday, September 21 | 7:30 am MDT

Workshop Option 1

Using the Moon as a Radiometric Calibration Reference

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Dr. Thomas Stone, U.S. Geological Survey
Dr. Xiaoxiong (Jack) Xiong, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

To meet tighter calibration requirements for space-based Earth observing systems, the option of using the Moon as an on-orbit calibration reference has received increased interest. Taken to its full development potential, lunar calibration can achieve sub-percent absolute radiometric accuracy post-launch, and enables a number of unique and important on-orbit calibration capabilities such as reference inter-calibration against high-accuracy benchmark sensors. This workshop provides practical information on using the Moon as a radiometric reference, with a focus on reflected-solar wavelengths. It is designed to help instrumentation scientists/engineers and mission developers who are tasked with calibrating sensors against the Moon. The presentations will cover topics of lunar calibration system development at USGS and operation of the ROLO lunar irradiance model; performance evaluation of the current model-based reference; tips for obtaining accurate lunar calibration measurements from imaging instruments; and requirements for new characterization measurements of the Moon, which are needed to refine the lunar reference and also offer opportunities for developing and applying new measurement technologies. The discussion will include recent advances in lunar calibration system development, including novel approaches to modeling and the potential to extend the range of validity in terms of phase angle and expanding wavelength coverage to other spectral regions. Also presented in this workshop are select examples of and lessons from using the Moon for calibrating and characterizing on-orbit sensors, such as Terra and Aqua MODIS as well as S-NPP and NOAA-20 VIIRS.

Dr. Thomas Stone, U.S. Geological Survey

Tom Stone is head of the lunar calibration facility at USGS in Flagstaff, Arizona, known as ROLO. He is co-developer of the ROLO model for lunar spectral irradiance that is widely utilized as a reference for on-orbit calibration of reflected solar wavelength sensors. Dr. Stone received his Ph.D. in atmospheric science from the University of Arizona in Tucson, where he developed calibrations for low light-level spectral imaging instruments flown on the Space Shuttle and into deep space. At USGS, he works to improve the accuracy of the ROLO lunar reference, and to expand the utilization of lunar calibration in remote sensing applications.

Dr. Xiaoxiong (Jack) Xiong, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

Jack Xiong is an optical physicist in the Biospheric Sciences Laboratory at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, currently supporting Terra, Aqua, S-NPP, JPSS, and CLARREO Pathfinder (CPF) projects/missions on sensor calibration and characterization. He has served as the Technical Lead for the NASA’s MODIS/VIIRS Characterization Support Team (MCST/VCST) and the MODIS Project Scientist for instrument operation and calibration. He received a B.S. degree in optical engineering from Beijing Institute of Technology and a Ph.D degree in physics from University of Maryland. Before joining the NASA/GSFC, he had also worked in the fields of optical instrumentation, nonlinear optics, laser and atomic spectroscopy, and resonance ionization mass spectrometry at the University of Maryland, College Park and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Gaithersburg, Maryland.



Workshop Option 2

Integrating Spheres

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Chris Durell, Labsphere, Inc.
Dr. Dan Scharpf, Labsphere, Inc.

The first part of this workshop will cover the basic physics of Lambertian materials and integrating spheres and provide a practical understanding of the “rules of thumb” for sphere design based on the use-case. Course material will cover many common applications such as light measurement, laser power measurements, reflectance and transmittance measurements, quantum efficiency and other uses focusing on new users and practical applications. The second part of the course is focused on using integrating spheres as uniform sources and ultimately, as absolute calibration references. Discussion will move from theory to practice and specifications. Case studies on real satellite calibration with world-class uncertainties will be given with the experts involved in these projects.

Chris Durell, Labsphere, Inc.

Chris Durell is the Director of Business Development, Remote Sensing, for Labsphere. Chris holds a BSEE and an MBA and has worked for Labsphere, Inc in many executive capacities. He is currently leading Business Development for Remote Sensing Technology. He has lead product development efforts in optical systems, light measurement and remote sensing systems for over two decades. Chris accepted the inaugural Chair position for the IEEE P4001 Hyperspectral Standards Working Group in 2018.

Dr. Dan Scharpf, Labsphere, Inc.

Dr. Scharpf is Vice President of Engineering for Labsphere. He has been with Labsphere for ten years with roles spanning Sales, Engineering Management, and Executive Management. He has contributed to the design of standard and custom systems for Labsphere’s full range of products including light metrology, remote sensing systems, and diffuse targets. Prior to joining Labsphere Dr. Scharpf worked at ANSYS and Boeing where he was involved in testing, modeling, and analyzing engineering solutions in the areas of fluid dynamics, turbomachinery, acoustics, thermal management, and uncertainty. He holds a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering from the University of Dayton and a master’s degree and Ph.D. in aerospace engineering from the University of Notre Dame.

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